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Annual Reports

Reaching Out to Rural Practices in Tennessee

As a Pediatric Portfolio Sponsor with the ABP, the Tennessee Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (TNAAP) approves quality improvement (QI) projects for Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Part 4 credit. But unlike many Portfolio Sponsors that work solely in hospitals in large urban areas, TNAAP also focuses on primary care settings in small towns across the state through its Pediatric Healthcare Improvement Initiative for Tennessee (PHiiT) and other programs. This is the story of one such practice.

Breast Milk for Babies

Colostrum Kits Increase Early Breast Milk Feeding in Very Low Birth Weight Infants

Infants weighing less than 1500 grams (3 lb. 5 oz.) at birth typically spend six weeks or more in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) before going home with their families. Yet the benefits of receiving their mother’s breast milk soon after birth are well-documented and potentially lifesaving. And early expression of colostrum has been shown to increase a mother’s milk supply six weeks later.1

Data Visualization Highlights Disparities in Pediatrics, Drives Decision-Making

The ABP has transformed its workforce data book into an interactive experience through digital data visualizations.

Data relating to trainees, certification areas, and more can be filtered easily by gender, age, and location, instantly generating dynamic maps, graphs, and tables.

IDENTIFYING GEOGRAPHIC DISPARITIES

Dr. Michelle RheaultGeographic disparity is a significant problem in many subspecialties — an issue pediatric nephrologist Michelle Rheault, MD, sees in her field.

A Parents RX for Pediatricians — Get to Know Patients' Families

Tamela Milan-AlexanderTamela Milan-Alexander recovered from opioid addiction, regained custody of her six children, moved out of public housing, earned not only a bachelor’s degree, but also a master’s, and became a parent advocate, peer educator, developmental screener, community health worker, and case manager.

Public Volunteers Contribute to ABP Mission

Rutledge Hutson is a child advocate and a mom. She also volunteers as one of two public (non-physician) members* of the 15-member ABP Board of Directors.

“It’s important that the Board has people who are not physicians to bring a different perspective to decisions,” she says.

Public members represent parents and other members of the public who rely on certification as a way of knowing that a pediatrician has completed an accredited pediatric training program and continues to stay up to date on the latest medical knowledge and best practices.

Professional Services: The ABP ‘Dream Team’

Calling them meeting planners is like calling Julia Child a cook. Technically, yes, they plan every detail to ensure that the purpose and goals of meetings are met, but they do so much more and do it with flair! For example, overseeing the interactions and relations with the ABP volunteers and other certified pediatricians and organizations also is on their bill of fare.

ABP Publishes 2017 Annual Report

The 2017 Annual Report from the American Board of Pediatrics is now available. 

Building Strong Careers from Residency to Retirement

Pediatricians in practice have spent, on average, four years in medical school and have successfully completed three years in pediatric residency (plus another two-to-three years if they trained in a subspecialty).

These pediatricians have qualified for a medical license in each state in which they practice. And the majority have taken and passed an intense, seven-hour, 335-question exam to become certified by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP).

This wealth of skills and knowledge provides a strong foundation on which to start a successful and rewarding career. 

Improving Training to Promote Lifelong Learning

Dr. Pamela Londres confers with Dr. Christian Lawrence.The journey of continuous learning for pediatricians begins during residency, when they are gaining the competencies to provide medical care for children without direct supervision. During these years of training, they are guided by pediatric program directors who, along with other pediatric faculty members, monitor their progress and help them identify and fill gaps in their knowledge and skills.

Thrive at Five

When a young child comes into the primary care center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, the medical team reviews vaccination records, checks weight, and screens for dental, vision, and hearing health. As part of the hospital’s Thrive at Five project, the team also checks the child’s speech, literacy, and mental, emotional, and behavioral health. If a child is lagging in any of these areas, the medical team helps the parent or guardian find appropriate resources to prepare the child to succeed in kindergarten.