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International In-Training Examination (I-ITE) FAQs for Trainees

Answers to Trainee FAQs

Will I be ABP-certified in pediatrics if I pass the I-ITE?

No. The I-ITE is not a certification exam, but it is used to assess your current pediatric knowledge. It is also used by trainee programs to determine how well the program is meeting the training needs of its residents as well as to guide remediation for residents who need additional training in specific areas.

Who is eligible to take the I-ITE?

The I-ITE is restricted to individuals who are currently completing a pediatric residency program. Your program director or administrator is responsible for registering all of the residents in your program for the exam.  

What is the format of the I-ITE?

The I-ITE is an online, proctored exam that is given over a secure browser, usually in the English language (you may use an English language dictionary during the exam). You will have 3.5 hours to complete the exam, plus 20 minutes of break time. Click Check Readiness in the Exam Tutorial/Demo to run a system check and see a sample of the test (Test Delivery Check).

 
 

How are the results of the test used?

The exam results are used to assess your progress through your training program as well as how well the program itself is meeting the training needs of its residents. The results will demonstrate the areas in which you and your peers are proficient, as well as areas needing improvement. This allows your program director or administrator to work with you to ensure that your training needs are fully met. Results are also compared (when available) with those of other entities offering similar training in your country and with results from within the United States.

When will I get my results?

The results are usually available within six weeks after the exam and will be sent directly to your program director or administrator. In addition to your score, you will get specific feedback on items that you answered incorrectly so that you have a better understanding of what you are expected to know.